For Sale!

Tannery.in

चमड़े का कारख़ाना, 制革厂, Tannery; Brand | Company | Product | Service | India | West Bengal | Kolkata | Tamil Nadu | Automotive | Furniture | Upholstery | Safety Lifestyle Footwear | Bags | Belts | Sporting Goods |  Equestrian Equipment

East India Leather is an Indian vegetable-tanned leather produced by the tanneries in #Trichy and #Dindigul in #Tamil Nadu #West #Bengal #Kolkata #Nadu.


WAIT… DO NOT GO!

I love this Name and I would like to HELP and be part of a popular movement for Profit and Nonprofit Organizations.  I would love to work with partners that have similar opportunities. Please let me know if I can help in any way. Here is more information about me 


tannery is the place where the skins are processed. Tanning hide into leather involves a process which permanently alters the protein structure of skin, making it more durable and less susceptible to decomposition, and also possibly coloring it.

By some estimates, India has more than 2,000 tanneries that produce more than 2 billion square feet of leather annually, making the nation one of the world’s largest exporters of processed leather. Most of the tanneries are located in the states of West Bengal (Kolkata) and Tamil Nadu.

#West #Bengal #Kolkata #Tamil #Nadu.

Keyword
Similarity
Volume
18% 590
15% 590
5% 70
8% 3600
10% 10
10% 3600
10% 10
50% 1600
10% 260
5% 10
20% 2900
23% 90
25% 90
23% 90
23% 90
25% 90
25% 110
28% 110
23% 70
25% 260
Keyword
Similarity
Volume
10% 5400
10% 5400
10% 5400
10% 4400
15% 4400
10% 4400
10% 8100
10% 4400
10% 3600
10% 3600

Tanning methods[edit]

Tanning processes largely differ in which chemicals are used in the tanning liquor. Some common types include:

  • Vegetable-tanned leather is tanned using tannins extracted from vegetable matter, such as tree bark prepared in bark mills. It is the oldest known method. It is supple and light brown in color, with the exact shade depending on the mix of materials and the color of the skin. The color tan derives its name from the appearance of undyed vegetable-tanned leather. Vegetable-tanned leather is not stable in water; it tends to discolor, and if left to soak and then dry, it shrinks and becomes harder, a feature of vegetable-tanned leather that is exploited in traditional shoemaking. In hot water, it shrinks drastically and partly congeals, becoming rigid and eventually brittle. Boiled leather is an example of this, where the leather has been hardened by being immersed in hot water, or in boiled wax or similar substances. Historically, it was occasionally used as armor after hardening, and it has also been used for book binding.
  • Chrome-tanned leather is tanned using chromium sulfate and other chromium salts. It is also known as “wet blue” for the pale blue color of the undyed leather. The chrome tanning method usually takes approximately one day to complete, making it best suited for large-scale industrial use. This is the most common method in modern use. It is more supple and pliable than vegetable-tanned leather and does not discolor or lose shape as drastically in water as vegetable-tanned. However, there are environmental concerns with this tanning method, as chromium is a heavy metal; while the trivalent chromium used for tanning is harmless, other byproducts can contain toxic variants. The method was developed in the latter half of the 19th century as tanneries wanted to find ways to speed up the process and to make leather more waterproof.
  • Aldehyde-tanned leather is tanned using glutaraldehyde or oxazolidine compounds. It is referred to as “wet white” due to its pale cream color. It is the main type of “chrome-free” leather, often seen in shoes for infants and automobiles. Formaldehyde has been used for tanning in the past; it is being phased out due to danger to workers and sensitivity of many people to formaldehyde.
    • Chamois leather is a form of aldehyde tanning that produces a porous and highly water-absorbent leather. Chamois leather is made using marine oils (traditionally cod oil) that oxidize to produce the aldehydes that tan the leather.
  • Brain tanned leathers are made by a labor-intensive process that uses emulsified oils, often those of animal brains such as deer, cattle, and buffalo. They are known for their exceptional softness and washability.
  • Alum leather is transformed using aluminium salts mixed with a variety of binders and protein sources, such as flour and egg yolk. Alum leather is not actually tanned; rather the process is called “tawing”, and the resulting material reverts to rawhide if soaked in water long enough to remove the alum salts.